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Controlled drugs are subject to additional legal controls as they carry a higher risk of being misused or causing harm

You can find a list of controlled drugs commonly encountered in practice on the Home Office website.

There are certain restrictions on who can administer controlled drugs under PGDs. More information is set out on the Specialist Pharmacy Service website.

There are also restrictions for prescribers. Supplementary prescribers can prescribe controlled drugs, but only in accordance with a service user’s clinical management plan. Independent prescribers cannot prescribe controlled drugs unless extra laws have been passed which allow their profession to do so.

Chiropodist / podiatrist and physiotherapist independent prescribers may prescribe from a limited list of controlled drugs for the treatment of organic disease or injury. The controlled drug must be prescribed to be administered by the specified method.

  • Diazepam by oral administration
  • Dihydrocodeine by oral administration
  • Lorazepam by oral administration
  • Temazepam by oral administration
  • Diazepam by oral administration
  • Dihydrocodeine by oral administration
  • Fentanyl by transdermal administration
  • Lorazepam by oral administration
  • Morphine by oral administration or by injection
  • Oxycodone by oral administration
  • Temazepam by oral administration

Pregabalin and gabapentin
From midnight on 1st April 2019, Gabapentin and Pregabalin were reclassified as Schedule 3 controlled drugs. This means HCPC registered prescribers can no longer independently prescribe these medicines. Read our joint statement on this change here

Page updated on: 25/03/2021
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