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Home > About Us > Equality and diversity > Assistive listening device for meetings

Assistive listening device for meetings

We have an assistive listening system available for use at all meetings in Park House.

If you would like information about using the system, and to ensure that it is available at the meeting you are due to attend, please contact your meeting organiser.


AHD small

What is an assistive listening system?

  • Deaf people can find it difficult to hear in large venues because of poor acoustics, often made worse by background noise and competing sounds.
  • Assistive listening devices replace the sound path between the sound source and the deaf person with a signal that is not affected by acoustics, or other sounds.
  • HCPC uses an RNID infra red system



How do I use it?

  • For people who do not have a hearing aid we provide headphones with volume controls. If you normally use a hearing aid, you will need to remove it before you can use this type of receiver.
  • Receivers are also available that work with hearing aids with a T setting. This is suitable for people with a greater level of hearing loss.
  • Infrared receivers are sometimes built in to headphones, but you will probably need a model designed for hard of hearing people.
  • Please let us know before the day of the meeting so that we can make sure the system is available.


Why use infrared?

  • Many meetings we hold involve confidential or otherwise sensitive discussions. Infrared systems do not transmit or spill sound outside of a room.
  • Infrared systems provide high quality sound and are less likely than hearing loops to suffer from interference.



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